What Is The Use Of A Safety Harness In Sailing

What Is The Use Of A Safety Harness In Sailing

A safety harness, in conjunction with tethers and jacklines, plays a crucial role in keeping you secure on deck during challenging weather conditions and preventing you from falling overboard. Harnesses are typically worn around the chest or waist and attach to the boat using a tether (or lanyard), which then connects to a strong point…

What Is A Jackline?

What Is A Jackline?

A jackline is an essential safety feature for sailors, especially when working on the deck in rough conditions. It is a rope, wire, or webbing that stretches from the bow to the stern of a sailboat, providing a secure attachment point for the crew’s safety harness.  By connecting their harness to the jackline, sailors can…

The Best EPIRBs For Offshore Boating

The Best EPIRBs For Offshore Boating

Whether you’re a seasoned mariner or a weekend boater, understanding the importance of a reliable EPIRB is crucial for safety. Drawing from my own experiences on the water, I’ve selected options that balance functionality, durability, and ease of use. Join me in navigating these lifesaving devices, ensuring your peace of mind while you enjoy the…

How to Register an EPIRB?

How to Register an EPIRB?

Beacons operating at 406 Mhz, including EPIRBs and PLBs, are required to be registered with the relevant regulatory body in your boating country, like the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) in America. To register an Emergency Position Indicating Radio Beacon in the United States, you have three options. Don’t worry, I’ll cover Canada, the…

Do I Need an EPIRB?

Do I Need an EPIRB?

An Emergency Position Indicating Radio Beacon (EPIRB) is a device designed to save your life when all else has failed.  Having an EPIRB on board not only increases your chances of survival, but regulations in certain situations also require it. But do you need an EPIRB, and if so, which type is best for your…

How Does a Hydrostatic Release Work?

How Does a Hydrostatic Release Work?

When submerged in water, a Hydrostatic Release Unit (HRU) is activated by water pressure at a specific depth, usually around 4 meters.  This pressure causes the unit’s release mechanism to function, allowing the liferaft or EPIRB to separate from the sinking vessel and float to the surface.  There are different types of HRUs, some of…

A Guide Hydrostatic Release Units (HRUs)

A Guide Hydrostatic Release Units (HRUs)

As a seasoned sailor and maritime safety enthusiast, I’m excited to share my insights on Hydrostatic Release Units (HRUs) with you. This article introduces you to the world of HRUs, covering their operation, types, and crucial regulations. I understand the intricacies around maritime safety equipment and aim to provide clear, reliable guidance. Drawing from my…